Black Olive Bonsai Trees

Black Olive Bonsai Tree
  • Also generally known as Common Olive or European Olive. Silvery leaves and white bark make this an extremely interesting looking tree. This original tree creates the edible olive that’s additionally utilized to produce olive oil. To support fruiting, keep at 35F for weeks during wintertime. Olea are regularly used as shade trees or planted in groves. Creates blooms on second-year branch development. Transplants best-in summertime. Bears poor soil, heat, drought and adores the sun. Exceptional for inside.

  • Native to the Caribbean and areas of Fl. Not the edible olive that people all know and adore, but does create a little, black seed capsule. An evergreen tree with a smooth trunk and egg-shaped canopy. The exuberant, dark bluish green, leathery leaves may be more than 2 2″ long and are clustered in the branch points, sometimes combined with 1″ extended spines located along the branches. Adores the sunlight and warmth. Don’t expose to temporary workers below 40F.

What is Black Olive Bonsai & Care Guide

Learn all about Black Olive Bonsai Trees and how to take care of it.
Scientific/Botanical NameOlea europaea
DescriptionBlack Olive tree is non-deciduous: The tree remains evergreen year-round. It is indigenous to the Mediterranean region, and is the source of olives and olive oil. After flowering, the tree produces the olive fruit at the end of summer.
PositionThe tree needs full summer sun. If grown indoors, place the tree outside during the summer months. Keep the tree cooler in winter, but avoid freezing conditions.
WateringAllow the plant to dry out slightly, and then give it a thorough watering.
FeedingFeed every other week during spring and summer. Bonsai fertilizer is best, yet regular plant food may be used -- but only at half strength. No fertilization is necessary in the three months following re-potting.
Leaf and Branch PruningPrune to shape the tree in the fall. By pinching-out the stems, smaller leaves will be encouraged.
Re-potting & Growing MediumRe-pot the tree after two or three years, and always in the spring. The ball of the roots should be trimmed by about one third. Use soil that allows for free drainage.
WiringThe tree branches are fragile, and it is best to apply wire during periods of dormancy.
NotesThe olive tree is an ideal specimen for training as a bonsai, and is amenable to many styles of shaping.

The Black Olive species is one of the most beloved types of Bonsai because of its lush leaves and interesting growth pattern. Native to the Florida Keys, Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Bahamas, the trees tend to do best in warm climates and have a very high tolerance for salt, making them good options for those who live by the sea.

Growing Conditions

Lighting

Black Olive Bonsai trees flourish in zones that receive plenty of full sun. Even as indoor plants, the trees require a significant amount of sunlight.

Temperature

The trees grow best in zones 10B to 11. Ideally, the Black Olive tree should be kept in temperatures under 64 degrees during winter, but they should never be exposed to temperatures below 40 degrees.

Watering & Feeding

Watering

Black Olive Bonsais should be well-watered and never dry. Close attention must be paid to watering because Bonsai trees are grown in small pots and therefore dry out much more quickly than plants grown in the ground or in larger pots. To water the Black Olive Bonsai, place the pot in a sink filled with two inches of water. Let the water seep into the pot through the drainage holes. You may also mist your Black Olive Bonsai once each week to keep leaves hydrated.

Feeding

The Black Olive tree should be fertilized mid-spring using a pulverized organic formula. A general purpose plant food may be used once every two weeks from spring until autumn.

Pruning

Pruning to Create New Shoots

Black Olive trees do not produce new shoots when a branch is pruned. If you wish to foster new shoots, let them mature into branches before shortening them.

Pruning to Develop Foliage

To develop new leaves, use your fingers to pinch off the first few leaves per branch, leaving green stems behind.

Black Olive Bonsai Trees For Sale

  • Stiff dark-green needles (3″-5″ extended) appear in pairs. Large, grayish-white terminal buds help distinguish it from other pines. Much sought after in bonsai and takes many years to get the look of a superior specimen bonsai. Hardy. Enjoys sun. Keep outside.

  • Stiff dark-green needles (3″-5″ extended) appear in pairs. Large, grayish-white terminal buds help distinguish it from other pines. Much sought after in bonsai and takes many years to get the look of a superior specimen bonsai. Hardy. Enjoys sunlight. Keep outside.

  • The blackberry is an edible fruit made by the species Rubus. What differentiates the blackberry from its raspberry family members is if the torus (stalk)is decided with all the fruit. When deciding on a a blackberry fresh fruit, the torus (stalk) remains using the fruit. The normally black fruit isn’t a berry in the botanical sense but is an aggregate fruit, composed of little drupelets. The fruit is created by honey-bees and other pollinators. Blackberries are perennial plants which produce arching & vigorous developing canes. The blooms are produced in late spring & early summer. Each blossom is all about 2-3 cm in diameter with five (5) white or light pink petals. Keep outside as a winter chill must stimulate flower bud growth.

  • Native to the Caribbean and areas of Fl. Not the edible olive that people all know and adore, but does create a little, black seed capsule. An evergreen tree with a smooth trunk and egg-shaped canopy. The exuberant, dark bluish green, leathery leaves may be more than 2 2″ long and are clustered in the branch points, sometimes combined with 1″ extended spines located along the branches. Adores the sunlight and warmth. Don’t expose to temporary workers below 40F.

Shaping

Natural Shape vs. Bonsai Shape

Full-grown Black Olive trees are characterized by their pyramidal shape and dense oval crown. In Bonsai form, the trees are prized for their exotic shapes made by zigzagging branches that spiral as they grow. Alternating branchlets are often wired to create a more classic shape with raised tops. Black Olives look particularly attractive when grown in a windswept design.

Wiring For Shape

Always use the thinnest wire possible to secure the branch in the desired position. To keep the wire from loosening, wind the training wire in the same direction of the branch’s bend. Caution must be taken to not wrap the wire too tightly, which will result in scarring. Start the wiring process at the Black Olive’s base so the trunk serves as an anchor. Continue to wire along the branch that will be trained. Repeat the process on all branches that require training, using the trunk as an anchor each time.

Black Olives may scar more easily than other Bonsai species, so carefully watch for signs of cutting when wiring. If you notice cuts in the bark, remove the wire immediately to prevent scarring. The tree can be rewired using more gentle techniques once the old wire is removed.

Repotting

Black Olive Bonsai trees may be repotted once every three to four years. Black Olive roots are highly sensitive compared to other tropical trees, so avoid doing a major pruning all at once. When repotting, gradually reduce the roots but avoid eliminating more than 30 percent of the root ball. About half of the fine roots should be maintained. Repot during May or June to ensure that the Black Olive can regenerate new roots before cooler weather arrives. Always repot using a fast draining soil that contains a high concentration of sand and lime.

Common Problems

Mold

Black Olives are particularly susceptible to mold problems during wet weather periods in winter and autumn. A mild fungicide may be applied as needed to remedy mold problems.

Pests

The trees may become hosts for ants, aphids and eryphide mites. If pests are a problem, use a gentle insecticide that contains resmethrin, acephate or triforine to eliminate insects without harming the tree. To prevent pests, Black Olive trees may be treated every three months with a non-toxic spray but should never be treated when the soil is dry.

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