Stone Landscape Scene

Showing all 7 results


  • The rocks selected for this unusual arrangement are imported and washed in acid, making them strikingly distinctive. We then cut and cement the rocks to one side of the pot and make an ample nicely on the other side to to keep water. A ceramic bridge is cemented to the stone on both sides. A pagolda figurine can also be added and cemented to the stone located over the bridge. To finish the picture, we cement a miniature, glazed, mud figurine fisherman overlooking the water, carrying a fishing pole and fish. On the contrary side of the restful scene, we’ve chosen for planting, the Infant Jade. This succulent bonsai, also called the “Elephant Bush”, is native Only to South Africa Africa and has light green leaves which are nearly round and about one third the dimensions of the common Jade plant. The fleshy trunk, branches and leaves are accustomed to keep water. An outstanding indoor bonsai, ideal for office or home.

  • The rocks selected for this unusual arrangement are imported and washed in acid, making them strikingly distinctive. We then cut and cement the rocks to one side of the pot, leaving an ample well between them to hold water. A ceramic bridge is cemented to the stone on both sides. A miniature, glazed mud figurine which looks out on the water can also be added and cemented in place. To finish the picture, a pagoda figurine is cemented to the stone located over the bridge. On the other side of the restful scene, we’ve chosen for planting, a low-maintenance, simple-to-care-for Ficus bonsai. The whole landscape is arranged within an attractive, glazed, imported ceramic container.

  • Native to China and Eastern Asia and now grown ornamentally in America. The berries are used as a “yin” tonic in traditional Chinese medicine to get a broad array of conditions, including premature aging, tinnitus and chronic toxicity. White flowers are attractive during late spring and early summer. We minimize and cement stone to a side of the pot with the ample nicely to to keep water. A ceramic bridge is cemented to the stone on both sides. A pagoda figurine is also added and cemented to the stone located over the bridge. To complete the picture, we cement a miniature glazed mud figurine fisherman overlooking the water-holding a fishing pole and fish. Does really nicely indoors.

  • Here is the tree that we recommend if you’re inexperienced with bonsai or you don’t possess a green-thumb. In our view it’s among the simplest bonsai trees to take care of. We minimize and cement stone to a side of the pot with the ample nicely to to keep water. A ceramic bridge is cemented to the stone on both sides. A pagoda figurine is also added and cemented to the stone located over the bridge. To complete the picture, we cement a miniature glazed mud figurine fisherman overlooking the water-holding a fishing pole and fish.

  • The rocks selected for this unusual arrangement are imported and washed in acid making them strikingly distinctive. We then cut and cement the rocks to one side of the pot, leaving an ample well between them to hold water. A ceramic bridge is cemented to the stone on both sides. A pagoda figurine is also added and cemented to the stone located over the bridge. To complete the picture, we cement a miniature, glazed, mud figurine fisherman overlooking the water-holding a fishing pole and fish. On the other side of the restful scene, we’ve chosen for planting, the ever-popular Juniper bonsai. The whole landscape is arranged within an attractive, glazed, imported ceramic container.

  • Open and airy conifer (cone bearing) with light-green foliage turning darker with age. Among the most famous trees in the South Pacific. Will tolerate warm temperatures and does not object to dryness, even though it doesn’t like glaring sun. Decorates well for any holiday or time. Woods tree team – each 5 years aged. Very easy indoor care. The rocks selected for this unusual arrangement are imported and washed in acid making them strikingly distinctive. We then cut and cement the rocks to one side of the pot, leaving an ample well between them to hold water. A ceramic bridge is cemented to the stone on both sides. A pagoda figurine is also added and cemented to the stone located over the bridge. To complete the picture, we cement a miniature, glazed, mud figurine fisherman overlooking the water-holding a fishing pole and fish. On the other side of the restful scene, we’ve chosen for planting, the ever-popular Norfolk Island Pine. The whole landscape is arranged within an attractive, glazed, imported ceramic container.

  • Fig species that’s native to South and Southeast Asia. This evergreen tree is very good for bonsai training as they produce sturdy trunks and also have great branching features and glossy leaves. Better to trim in early summer as the newest leaves that subsequently grow will be smaller compared to the ones removed. Great for indoors year round. The brighter the place, the scaled-down the growth.


Showing all 7 results