Best Bonsai Trees For Beginners

Best Beginner Bonsai Tree

If you’re new to Bonsai, the good news is that there are a lot of ideal Bonsai plants for beginners. Even experienced hobbyists looking for a good gift Bonsai will do well to recall the basics of Bonsai, because it’s easy to forget what you know, as your practices become second nature and instinctual, thus leaving out important details when introducing Bonsai to your friends who are beginners to Bonsai.

To bring nature into your house or garden in an affordable way, there’s really nothing out there for sale that’s as easy as Bonsai. This review has shown a few types of Bonsai species that are ideal for beginners. There are Bonsai that are affordable in price, with some that are easy to take care of in terms of maintenance. There are different options to allow you to select one that fits the type of style you are looking for, whether it’s a more traditional looking Bonsai tree, or a hardier tree that may look less traditional.

Bonsai plants are an especially good deal because they last so long. Don’t let the low prices trick you into thinking that Bonsai plants are cheap, though since they can literally survive over a hundred years; when cared for properly, your Bonsai is perhaps the only pet you could buy, which could legitimately outlive you.

Overall, Bonsai is an incredibly rewarding hobby and is something you can inspire your friends to become passionate about as well.

The majesty and grandeur of nature embodies a special and serene kind of beauty that no human being can deny. People are almost always going camping and getting outside, and most of the people interested in beginner Bonsai trees have some kind of appreciation for nature that they are looking to express and better invite into their lifestyle.

Over time, as people have moved into more urbanized areas and cities, we have achieved a growing tension of sorts. We like nature, but we want the safety of home– so that is why it has become harder and more difficult to re-create nature inside our living individual spaces.

The Origins of Bonsai

Bonsai is the ancient East Asian tradition of growing and cultivating miniature pet trees indoors or potted in a garden. Bonsai is about taking a small part of nature, and bringing it into our lives, letting it lift up the artificial environment around us with its serene energy and scent.

With influences dating back to ancient China, Bonsai was popularized in Japan over a thousand years ago and is a Japanese word meaning a potted plant or tree. Bonsai trees are tiny nature-scapes, and traditionally are offered for sale with some kind of moss, pebble, and / or rock sculptures at the foot of the tree, giving it the feel of more of a fresh or complete scene, rather than your typical houseplant in soil.

Life gets so mundane without little oases of nature placed around us in carefully designed ways. Sterile, plant-free environments are generally harsh and as indoor plants go, Beginner Bonsai trees are some of the easiest, longest-living, and most rewarding plants to work with.

If you’re new to the art of Bonsai and are looking for easy Bonsai trees to grow, this review will help to elucidate on how to get started caring for your Bonsai and how to keep it healthy. Even experienced hobbyists Bonsai growers will find good gift ideas below to help inspire ideas for how to give the gift of a Bonsai to beginners.

Bonsai Tree Beginner Basics

Firstly, Bonsai trees are indeed tiny little trees, but they actually are no different genetically than their full-sized clones and cousins. There are indeed “dwarf” types of species out there for sale in the world of Bonsai, but these are mainly bred to keep leaf size small for the eventual plant that emerges. Nonetheless, Bonsai trees will naturally grow smaller leaves as they are pruned, potted, and prevented from growing to a normal size for a tree. Similarly to how goldfish grow to fit the size of their containers, Bonsai trees stay small because their root systems are limited to the size of the pot, and because the Bonsai gardener keeps pruning the tree, thus limiting its growth to a miniature size.

Perhaps the biggest challenge with a beginner Bonsai tree is finding a happy medium when it comes to watering. Two of the biggest reasons Bonsai trees die early are due to overwatering or underwatering. Over-watering your Bonsai can quickly result in root rot. Thus, it’s vital to understand whether the soil in your Bonsai tree should always be damp, or if it should usually be dry. Evergreen Bonsai trees, for example, need more water and their soil needs to stay damp, while tropical Bonsai trees typically require less water and are more susceptible to root rot. Every Bonsai tree species is different, so it’s crucial to understand what your tree will specifically need in watering. Then, keep a close eye on the plant to make sure it’s staying healthy and not falling prey to pests.

Interestingly enough, fruit from Bonsai trees is not always smaller than from full-sized trees. Fruits such as pomegranates, apples, figs, lemons, limes, oranges, and other citrus, all grow on Bonsai trees as well, and are edible. Pomegranates and figs grow on Bonsai trees in a small size, but figs, apples, and citrus often bloom to a roughly full-sized diameter from Bonsai trees. Certainly, you can imagine that a fully sized Meyer lemon would weigh down the branch of a small Bonsai lemon tree. This is why it is important to use wire reinforcements for the branches of a young Bonsai tree.

In terms of what’s out there for sale, for the price, there is no more efficient way to get real fruit grown inside your house than by working with Bonsai. For the best prices and quality of beginner bonsai trees, visit Bonsai Boy (insert affiliate link).

Best Pruning Practices for Bonsai Tree Beginners

In order to get great fruit and flowers from a Bonsai tree, pruning is vital. Clipping stray twigs and branches containing old decaying fruits and flowers will give your tree the best chance to regrow and flower again as soon as possible. For trimming your Bonsai tree, the pencil rule is helpful for knowing what tool to use.

For twigs smaller than the diameter of a pencil, any sharp sturdy pair of shears will do well. Just keep in mind that you want to trim the Bonsai tree as close to the root’s branch (or the trunk) as possible, so as to minimize scarring on your Bonsai tree. This will also help minimize your plant’s recovery time.

For any twigs larger than the diameter of a pencil, concave shears are necessary. These shears have a bent tip and almost look a bit more like fingernail clippers than shears.  The point of these types of shears is to cut the branches in a way that keeps the resulting nub as small as possible.

It’s vital to remember that while it’s fast and easy to cut branches off from your Bonsai tree, it’s a slow and patient process to get new growth back– so it’s a good tip for beginners to clip the Bonsai tree sparingly, and be patient.

Hawaiian Umbrella

There are a lot of great plants to start off with for Bonsai, but one of the most popular and typically cheap in terms of price is the Hawaiian Umbrella Bonsai tree (click here to see lowest prices). Also called the Dwarf Umbrella, Golden Hawaiian Umbrella, or Schefflera arboricola, this plant is very hardy indoors, and is perhaps the easiest to care for due to its tolerance for dehydration and lack of light. All plants, of course, need light and water to survive, but the Hawaiian Umbrella can go without these staples for longer than almost any other type of Bonsai tree, which makes it a fantastic choice for a person’s first Bonsai tree.

Hawaiian Umbrella trees are actually native to Taiwan and are thus tropical plants. They were originally made popular as Bonsai trees by David Fukumoto, a resident of Hawaii, which is where they get the Hawaiian reference in their name. It’s a common mistake to think that these plants are native to Hawaii, which is also tropical.

The main challenge with these Hawaiian Umbrella Bonsai trees comes in pruning them into a “traditional” Bonsai shape since they tend to have a mind of their own when it comes to growth. Their branches grow in thickly, so it’s easy to under or over-trim. Given this, a pair of good Bonsai shears will be a must-have with your Hawaiian Umbrella tree, which truly is one of the best beginner Bonsai trees out there.

Other than the Hawaiian Umbrella, great starter Bonsai species include the Ficus, which is also relatively easy tree, very immune to gardener error, and easy to grow indoors. Outdoor Bonsai trees are somewhat more difficult, in that they do need to be brought in if the weather drops below freezing for too long. Just needing light through a window, the Ficus can thrive indoors, which definitely keeps it in the “easy” category of what’s out there for sale (click here for lowest prices).

Hawaiian Umbrella Bonsai Trees For Sale

  • Here is the tree that we recommend if you’re inexperienced with bonsai or you don’t possess a green-thumb. In our view it’s among the simplest bonsai trees to take care of and is an extremely beautiful trouble free evergreen. Should you not know which tree to purchase as a present for somebody, this is the tree to pick. This versatile tree is very good for the house, workplace, dorm or anywhere and does well in lower or higher lighting conditions. We develop 5 trees together in a pot to provide the look of a grove or forest scene. Great for inside.

  • This here is the tree that we recommend if you’re inexperienced with bonsai or you don’t possess a green-thumb. In our view it’s among the simplest bonsai trees to take care of and is an extremely beautiful “trouble free” ever-green. Should you not know which tree to purchase as a present for somebody, this is the tree to pick. This versatile tree is very good for home, workplace, dorm or anywhere and does well in lower or higher lighting conditions. Our tree features tiny umbrella-shaped leaves forming a dense green canopy with the extensive banyan (antenna) root program. Quite popular easy indoor treatment. Really a brilliant work of art by nature. Anyone would be happy to own this impressive conversation piece.

  • Here is the tree that we recommend if you’re inexperienced with bonsai or you don’t possess a green-thumb. In our view it’s among the simplest bonsai trees to take care of and is an extremely beautiful trouble free evergreen. In the event you may not know which tree to purchase as a present for someone, here is the tree to pick. This versatile tree is very good for the house, workplace dorm or anywhere and does well in lower or higher lighting conditions. We develop 7 trees together in a pot to provide the look of a grove or forest scene. Great for inside

  • Here is the tree that we recommend if you’re inexperienced with bonsai or you don’t possess a green-thumb. In our view it’s among the simplest bonsai trees to take care of and is an extremely beautiful trouble free evergreen. Should you not know which tree to purchase as a present for somebody, this is the tree to pick. This versatile tree is very good for home, workplace, dorm or anywhere and does well in low to high-lighting conditions. We develop three together in a pot to provide the look of a grove or forest scene.

  • Here is the tree that we recommend if you’re inexperienced with bonsai or you don’t possess a green-thumb. In our view, it’s among the simplest bonsai trees to take care of and is an extremely beautiful “trouble free” ever-green. Should you not know which tree to purchase as a present for somebody, this is the tree to pick. This versatile tree is very good for home, workplace, dorm or anywhere and does well in low to high-lighting conditions. Our tree features tiny umbrella-shaped leaves forming a dense green canopy. Very popular and easy indoor care.

  • Root over Rock. Here is the tree that we recommend if you’re inexperienced with bonsai or you don’t possess a green-thumb. In our view it’s among the simplest bonsai trees to take care of and is an extremely beautiful trouble free evergreen. Should you not know which tree to purchase as a present for somebody, this is the tree to pick. This versatile tree is very good for home, workplace, dorm or anywhere and does well in low to high-lighting conditions. Our tree features tiny umbrella-shaped leaves forming a dense green canopy. This impressive trouble free evergreen has uncovered roots growing over a big textured rock and down to the soil. Very well-known and simple to take care of.

Baby Jade

Jade plants look fantastic, without a doubt, and the Baby Jade is an even more intriguing plant because the leaves stay so small. Jade is excellent as a Bonsai plant since it is so forgiving of an owner forgetting to water it. Baby Jade plants store relatively large amounts of water in their leaves, which they can draw on if there is a drought or in the event of a forgetful gardener.

Click here for the lowest prices on Baby Jade bonsai trees.

Baby Jade Bonsai Trees For Sale

Norfolk Island Pine

The classic miniature pine from Norfolk is an excellent choice when it comes to Bonsai. This species will do well with just about any style, and has a captivating, Christmas tree-like scent. Not actually pine trees, the Norfolk Pines need only a few hours of sunlight each day to get by. This Bonsai needs more water in summer and less in winter like almost all other Bonsai types, Norfolk Island Bonsais do best when the soil is almost dry but not quite arid.

Click here for the lowest prices on Norfolk Island Pine Bonsai trees.

Norfolk Island Pine Bonsai Trees For Sale

  • Open and airy conifer (cone bearing) with light-green foliage turning darker with age. Among the most famous trees in the South Pacific. Will tolerate warm temperatures and does not object to dryness, even though it doesn’t like glaring sun. Decorates well for any holiday or time. Woods tree team – each 5 years aged. Very easy indoor care. Our tree is put in a water pot which has a nicely on one side that retains water. We include a fisherman figure as well as a fishing pole and ceramic fish. The whole landscape is arranged within an attractive, glazed, imported ceramic container.

  • Open and airy conifer (cone bearing) with light-green foliage turning darker with age. Among the most famous trees in the South Pacific. Will tolerate warm temperatures and does not object to dryness, even though it doesn’t like glaring sun. Decorates well for any holiday or time. Very easy indoor care.

  • Open and airy conifer (cone bearing) with light-green foliage turning darker with age. Among the most famous trees in the South Pacific. Will tolerate warm temperatures and does not object to dryness, even though it doesn’t like glaring sun. Decorates well for any holiday or time. Woods tree team – each 5 years aged. Very easy indoor care. Our tree is put in a water pot which has a nicely on one side that retains water. We include a fisherman figure as well as a fishing pole and ceramic fish. The whole landscape is arranged within an attractive, glazed, imported ceramic container.

  • Open and airy conifer (cone bearing) with light-green foliage turning darker with age. Among the best understand trees in the South Pacific. Will tolerate warm temperatures and does not object to dryness, even though it doesn’t like glaring sun. Decorates well for any holiday or time. Very easy indoor care.

  • Open and airy conifer (cone bearing) with light-green foliage turning darker with age. Among the most famous trees in the South Pacific. Will tolerate warm temperatures and does not object to dryness, even though it doesn’t like glaring sun. We develop them in-groups of three (3) in a pot and trim the branches manually (thumb and index finger.) Decorates well for any holiday or time. Easy maintenance.

  • Open and airy conifer (cone bearing) with light-green foliage turning darker with age. Among the most famous trees in the South Pacific. Will tolerate warm temperatures and does not object to dryness, even though it doesn’t like glaring sun. Decorates well for any holiday or time. Woods tree team – each 5 years aged. Very easy indoor care. The rocks selected for this unusual arrangement are imported and washed in acid making them strikingly distinctive. We then cut and cement the rocks to one side of the pot, leaving an ample well between them to hold water. A ceramic bridge is cemented to the stone on both sides. A pagoda figurine is also added and cemented to the stone located over the bridge. To complete the picture, we cement a miniature, glazed, mud figurine fisherman overlooking the water-holding a fishing pole and fish. On the other side of the restful scene, we’ve chosen for planting, the ever-popular Norfolk Island Pine. The whole landscape is arranged within an attractive, glazed, imported ceramic container.

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  • Purplish red becoming green in late summer, deeply lobed. Red autumn color. Insignificant small reddish purple blooms in May-June. Deciduous. Keep outside. Available 1 2 months annually. Will not have any foliage during wintertime.

  • Hardy and simple to grow, this fine Maple will look great on an outdoor, deck or yard. Provide sun to be able to show best colors both in early spring and late into the the growing season. Deciduous. Keep outside.

  • Maidenhair Tree. The only representative of among the very ancient genera, the Gingko could be described as a true living fossil as its ancestors flourished in several areas of the planet through the Jurassic Period, in the evidence of fossils dating dating back to 200-million years past. The Ginko Biloba is the latest trend in both healthfoods and bonsai. It is regarded in eastern cultures as the “Elixir Of Youth of Youth” plant. The herbaceous plants in the mystical plant are presumed to enhance health and memory. Easily distinguishable from the attribute two-lobed, fan-shaped deciduous leaves which turn deep yellow in fall. Fruits arranged in clusters are golden-yellow when mature. Keep outside. Available 1 2 months annually. May not have any leaves during fall and wintertime.

  • This delightful wisteria we have all admired on a pergola or arbor has now been trained into a classic tree form. Using its glossy, bright green leaves which falls in the fall, and fragrant pea-like purple blossoms dangling in bunches, this bonsai is a brilliant show stopper when in flower. Deciduous. Keep outside.

  • Flowering crab apples are among the best flowering trees for bonsai. They create amazing white, fragrant blooms covering the whole tree in springtime before the leaves appears. The leaf is very little and lobed. Little green pomes (apples) can be found in in summer, based on the enlargement of the whole bloom receptacle which becomes fleshy. The fresh fruit ripens to all distinct colours in the autumn when the foliage starts to change to shades-of yellow, orange and reddish. Wintertime brings a fine twiggy skeletal outline punctuated by the fruit which continues through the winter. They’re not difficult to grow and fairly pest and disease-resistant. Deciduous. Keep outside. Available 1 2 months annually. Will not have any foliage during wintertime.

  • ‘Small Moses’ is a true dwarf form of the typical Euonymus that has brilliant red leaves in the autumn that’s difficult to lose. The leaves of the ‘little moses’ are considerably smaller as well as the branching is even much better compared to common Euonymus. The colour begins only a little after, but the leaves hang on the tree, vivid red, for considerably more. The colour begins as a deep maroon and slowly turns brilliant red. Deciduous. Keep outside.